Postdoctoral Scholar: UC Davis School of Education

Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of California Davis School of Education

Review of applications: August 14th, 2018. Apply by this date to ensure full consideration by the committee.

Final date: September 14th, 2018
Applications will continue to be accepted until this date, but those received after the review date will only be considered if the position has not yet been filled.

DESCRIPTION

The newly funded Teachers as Learners (TaL) Project in the School of Education at UC Davis seeks a full-time Postdoctoral Scholar with expertise and interest in teachers as learners, classroom communication and discourse, learning theories, and teacher education and development. The successful candidate will engage with and help manage the new project entitled “New Teachers Learning Disciplined Improvisation for Meaningful Talk in Diverse Classrooms” funded by the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

The project brings together a newly formed and exciting team of scholars, graduate and undergraduate students, and teacher partners to investigate teacher cognition and learning in core practices of classroom communication. The focus is on how teachers learn to lead discussions in secondary English and elicit student thinking in elementary science. We also focus on linguistically diverse learners and their communicative repertoires that may be leveraged for learning. Teachers need repertoires of knowledge and practice for classroom communication, and need the capacity to enact practices, reflect in and on action, and learn to adapt in-the-moment of classroom discourse ripe with opportunities for student learning. The project investigates cognitive underpinnings of disciplined improvisation, a form of adaptive expertise that benefits from conceptually rich knowledge of teaching practices and their effects. We explore ways novice teachers can learn improvisational processes, with discipline and structure, of in-the-moment facilitation.

Responsibilities

  • Coordinate a large team of scholars, students, and teachers
  • Engage in systematic processes for collecting, organizing, and analyzing data
  • Manage a large database of teacher writing, video footage, and audio taped conversations
  • Develop and share knowledge and theory that contributes to the research base
  • Work collaboratively to generate research results for multiple audiences
  • Facilitate small teacher teams engaged in professional development and teacher inquiry
  • Organize and participate in classroom observations in regional schools
  • Develop new tools/routines/data management/data analysis processes for project use
  • Keep abreast of relevant fields in educational research and development
  • Assist in proposal development for conference presentations and additional grant funding
  • Work together effectively with a variety of staff, advisory board members, and teacher partners on multiple project strands
  • Participate in site visits at local schools

Required qualifications

  • Ph.D. or equivalent in Teaching, Teacher Education, Learning Sciences, Curriculum & Instruction, Discourse Processes, or related field
  • Relevant research experience in settings serving culturally and linguistically diverse populations, with demonstrated equity orientation (via publications, presentations, research interest)
  • Rigorous training in classroom discourse analysis/discourse analysis
  • Demonstrated ability to publish research in academic journals
  • Demonstrated ability as a team player, willing to pitch in and do what needs to be done
  • Excellent communication skills

Preferred qualifications

  • P-12 teaching experience
  • Experience in teacher coaching or supervision
  • Project management experience

Other Opportunities and Expectations

  • Mentoring. This is a grant-funded, 100% FTE position under the mentorship of Dr. Steven Athanases, Professor, David and Dolly Fiddyment Chair in Teacher Education, School of Education, University of California, Davis. Opportunity for additional faculty mentorship will be provided.
  • Educational community. Working in a diverse, dynamic School of Education recently emerging as a national voice and site for research, development, and innovation.
  • Publications. The position likely will lead to co-authored presentation and publication opportunities.
  • Leadership. The position will offer many leadership opportunities.
  • Networking. The successful candidate will participate in a newly funded consortium of ten projects in the US, including annual summer meetings and other networking opportunities.
  • The position is for one year, with opportunities to continue in the role an additional 1-2 years, contingent upon successful performance.
  • The successful candidate will be provided with time to conduct independent work and writing on other projects.
  • Under Federal law, the University of California may employ only individuals who are legally able to work in the United States as established by providing documents as specified in the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.

Review of applications begins August 14, 2018 and will continue until position is filled. Salary will be commensurate with experience.

The project and the university are committed to equal employment opportunity and non-discrimination for all employees and qualified applicants without regard to a person’s race, color, gender, age, religion, national origin, ancestry, disability, veteran status, genetic information, sexual orientation, or any characteristic protected under applicable law.

JOB LOCATION

Davis, CA

LEARN MORE

More information about this recruitment: https://education.ucdavis.edu/join-our-team

REQUIREMENTS

Document requirements

  • Curriculum Vitae – Your most recently updated C.V.
  • Cover Letter
  • Statement of Research (Optional)
  • Statement of Contributions to Diversity – Diversity contributions documented in the application file will be used to evaluate applicants. Visit http://academicaffairs.ucdavis.edu/diversity/equity_inclusion/index.html for guidelines about writing a diversity statement and why one is requested.
Reference requirements
  • 3-5 references required (contact information only)

HOW TO APPLY

  1. Create an ApplicantID
  2. Provide required information and documents
  3. If any, provide required reference information
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Education – Assistant Professor (First Nations Education or Governance)

Education – Assistant Professor (First Nations Education or Governance) at the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton Campus)

Closes: 28 July 2018

Territorial Acknowledgment: The University of New Brunswick recognizes and respectfully acknowledges that all UNB course interactions take place on the unsurrendered and unceded traditional lands of Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet). This territory is covered by the Treaties of Peace and Friendship which the Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet), Mi’kmaq and Passamaquoddy peoples first signed with the British Crown in 1725. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Wolastoqey (Maliseet), Mi’kmaq and Passamaquoddy title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.

Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre, Faculty of Education, University of New Brunswick

The Faculty of Education at the University of New Brunswick invites applications for a continuing tenure track position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of First Nations Education or Governance. Applicants must have a doctoral degree in First Nations Education, Governance or related field, with evidence of or demonstrated potential for excellence in teaching and a beginning record of scholarly publishing. Some direct experience in First Nations community-based research is essential. The appointee will need to establish links with various local First Nation communities’ agencies and other colleagues working in this area. The preferred candidate will be of First Nations heritage.

Responsibilities will include teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels, coordinating academic programming in the Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre, supervising graduate student research in the Faculty of Education, and pursuing program funded research and scholarship. The appointment, effective January 1, 2019 or as soon as possible thereafter, will be at the Assistant Professor level.

The University of New Brunswick is one of the oldest public universities in Canada. It offers degrees in more than 60 disciplines encompassing a range of academic and professional programs. The Faculty of Education offers graduate and undergraduate programs in teacher education, as well as various graduate programs. The Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre has been a part of the faculty and university for over 30 years and offers a First Nations Teacher Education Program, a Bridging Year program for students entering a university degree for the first time and will begin to offer a Wabanaki Master of Education degree program in the near future. MWC is also expanding their public outreach and offering public colloquia and Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqey language courses. MWC is also the home of the UNB University Elder in Residence.

Fredericton, New Brunswick is located along Wolastoq (St. John River), has many kilometers of walking trails and a very active arts community. Noted as one of the world’s “smartest cities”, Fredericton provides an opportunity for a balanced, environmentally friendly lifestyle.

Applications should be submitted not later than August 15, 2018. Selection and interviews will be completed October 30, 2018. A letter of application, current curriculum vitae, a statement of research interests, two examples of scholarly publications reflecting your current research interests, a teaching portfolio, and name of three referees (one may be from outside a university) should be sent.

Application packages should be directed to:

Dean
Faculty of Education, The University of New Brunswick
PO Box 4400, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 5A3
Email: wjones@unb.ca
Phone 506-453-4862
Fax: 506-453-3569

The University of New Brunswick is committed to employment equity and fostering diversity within our community and developing an inclusive workplace that reflects the richness of the broader community that we serve. The University welcomes and encourages applications from all qualified individuals who will help us achieve our goals, including women, visible minorities, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of any sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. Preference will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada.

3 Assistant/Associate Professors of Educational Policy, Curriculum Theory, Measurement and Assessment positions

3 Assistant/Associate Professors of Educational Policy, Curriculum Theory, Measurement and Assessment positions at Queen’s University, Canada

Closes: 1 October, 2018

The Faculty of Education at Queen’s University invites applications for three Tenure-Track faculty positions. Two positions are at the rank of Assistant Professor with specializations in 1) Educational Policy and 2) Curriculum Theory. The third position is at the rank of  Assistant or Associate Professor with a specialization in the area of 3) Measurement and Assessment. All three positions have a preferred starting date of July 1, 2019.

Candidates must have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment. The main criteria for selection are academic and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research leading to peer assessed publications and the securing of external research funding, as well as strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and an ongoing commitment to academic and pedagogical excellence in support of the Faculty’s programs. Candidates must provide evidence of an ability to work collaboratively in an interdisciplinary and student-centred environment and must demonstrate knowledge of teacher education and familiarity with the context of schooling and schooling systems in Canada. The successful candidate will be required to make substantive contributions through service to the Faculty, the University, and the broader community. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

1) Educational Policy
The successful candidate must have an academic profile centered on understanding and influencing educational policy within school systems and teacher education programs. This profile will include 1) knowledge of and experience in teacher education; 2) an understanding of the role of educational policy in the school system and how to influence it; and, 3) demonstrated ability to support and increase the Faculty’s capacity in public policy work and in cross-university public policy initiatives.

2) Curriculum Theory
The successful candidate must have an academic profile centred on philosophical and theoretical curriculum foundations including 1) an understanding of the Canadian educational context; 2) an understanding of contemporary themes of curriculum and learning such as globalization, gender, traditions of wisdom, equity and diversity, etc.; and, 3) an understanding of how interpretive disciplines in curriculum and emergent theories of learning offer transformative ways of thinking about education.

3) Measurement and Assessment
The successful candidate must have an academic profile that centers on the use of educational measurement and assessment to inform and support student learning, teacher practice, or system decision-making. This profile will include 1) a thorough understanding of historical and contemporary measurement and assessment theories as related to classroom and large-scale assessment contexts; 2) extensive knowledge and experience with measurement in schools and educational agencies at local, national, and international levels; and 3) a developed or emerging program of research that uses quantitative methodologies to explore and develop educational measurement and assessment theory and practice.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:

  • a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
  • a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);
  • a statement of research interests;
  • a statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available);
  • one sample of recent scholarly work; and,
  • the names of three references.

These materials must be received by the Office of the Dean on or before October 1, 2018. Applications should be sent via email in one PDF file and addressed to:

Dr. Rebecca Luce-Kapler
Queen’s University, Faculty of Education
c/o erin.rennie@queensu.ca

For additional information about our Faculty and programs, please visit us at http://educ.queensu.ca.

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Erin Rennie in the Faculty of Education, Queen’s University, at erin.rennie@queensu.ca or 613-533-6000, ext. 75791.

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/collectiveagreement and at http://www.qufa.ca.

Two Excellent Blog Posts from FINE Members: Reflections on the 2018 FINE Events in New York City

Neera R. Jain

University of Auckland

In line with the AERA 2018 conference theme, this year’s FINE Forum focused on the topic The dreams, possibilities, and necessities of teaching in higher education. Too often positioned as secondary to research, throughout the day we were encouraged to recast teaching as central to our roles as academics in education. As such, our work for the day was to engage in an exploration of how we teach, prioritize teaching, and talk about teaching in our academic careers. In this post I share three key points I took away from the Forum, and a provocation for academic leadership.

First, consider teaching and research as mutually constitutive. In a panel of U21 educational leaders, Associate Professor Susan Bridges (Assistant Dean, Curriculum Innovation, University of Hong Kong) and Professor Mark Beauchamp (Associate Dean, Research, University of British Columbia) discussed how they achieved this in differing ways. Dr. Bridges was able to apply her research knowledge in the area of pedagogy to a role at a Dental faculty (a completely different subject area) to reshape their problem-based learning curriculum. Dr. Beauchamp explained his approach to this aim: attract students to his research through his dynamic teaching style, then using group processes to develop research ideas. In effect, melding teaching, research mentorship, and doing actual research. As a burgeoning academic, I can see real benefits to these approaches—both in the opportunity to put research to work in real learning spaces, and to consider how to build synergy between teaching and research.

Second, teach like a troublemaker. In the same panel, Professor Andrew Noyes (Head of School, University of Nottingham) encouraged us to bring critical scholarship into the classroom to trouble students’ thinking as a way to develop their critical consciousness in/for a neoliberal world. He recommended contemplation of key questions in service of this goal: Whom do we teach? Why are we teaching them? What are we trying to achieve? How do you work with people “not like you” and those who may have different goals? He encouraged integrating scholarship into this contemplation, such as Bourdieu’s work on social reproduction in education. This advice resonated with my commitments to social justice in my research and professional life, and sparked my thinking about how I could put these commitments to work in the classroom setting.

Third, develop a compelling teaching philosophy. The second half of the day was devoted to the question “Who am I as a teacher?” We engaged in discussion and activity around developing a teaching philosophy to coalesce our understanding of what we do (or aim to do) when we teach. Essentially, a teaching philosophy is a 1-2 page first-person “self-portrait” of you as a teacher that is carefully tailored to the specific job you are applying to. Dr. Jennifer Tatebe, Senior Lecturer at the University of Auckland and member of the FINE Leadership Team, encouraged us to consider a unique moment in our lives as teachers or learners that might exemplify how or why we teach the way we do, and how we might distinguish ourselves in writing that story. As a doctoral student who does not come from a teaching background, I recognized the process of developing the teaching philosophy as an important reflective exercise to think deeply about what I aim to do in teaching, what I am already doing that is working, and what areas of growth I might pursue while still on my doctoral journey and into an academic career.

Finally, a provocation for academic leaders in education: If we believe in the importance of teaching, how are you ensuring that it is a respected and nurtured aspect of academic work? How do you ensure doctoral students and early career researchers in particular have the opportunity and support to develop the necessary skills to become excellent teachers in the higher education setting? Rather than academics finding creative ways to make teaching count, how can this be structured into the way we do academia?

Thank you to the FINE leadership team for organizing an engaging and thought-provoking Forum, and for the U21 academic leaders who shared their experiences with us during the day and throughout the weekend.

In line with the AERA 2018 conference theme, this year’s FINE Forum focused on the topic The dreams, possibilities, and necessities of teaching in higher education. Too often positioned as secondary to research, throughout the day we were encouraged to recast teaching as central to our roles as academics in education. As such, our work for the day was to engage in an exploration of how we teach, prioritize teaching, and talk about teaching in our academic careers. In this post I share three key points I took away from the Forum, and a provocation for academic leadership.

First, consider teaching and research as mutually constitutive. In a panel of U21 educational leaders, Associate Professor Susan Bridges (Assistant Dean, Curriculum Innovation, University of Hong Kong) and Professor Mark Beauchamp (Associate Dean, Research, University of British Columbia) discussed how they achieved this in differing ways. Dr. Bridges was able to apply her research knowledge in the area of pedagogy to a role at a Dental faculty (a completely different subject area) to reshape their problem-based learning curriculum. Dr. Beauchamp explained his approach to this aim: attract students to his research through his dynamic teaching style, then using group processes to develop research ideas. In effect, melding teaching, research mentorship, and doing actual research. As a burgeoning academic, I can see real benefits to these approaches—both in the opportunity to put research to work in real learning spaces, and to consider how to build synergy between teaching and research.

Second, teach like a troublemaker. In the same panel, Professor Andrew Noyes (Head of School, University of Nottingham) encouraged us to bring critical scholarship into the classroom to trouble students’ thinking as a way to develop their critical consciousness in/for a neoliberal world. He recommended contemplation of key questions in service of this goal: Whom do we teach? Why are we teaching them? What are we trying to achieve? How do you work with people “not like you” and those who may have different goals? He encouraged integrating scholarship into this contemplation, such as Bourdieu’s work on social reproduction in education. This advice resonated with my commitments to social justice in my research and professional life, and sparked my thinking about how I could put these commitments to work in the classroom setting.

Third, develop a compelling teaching philosophy. The second half of the day was devoted to the question “Who am I as a teacher?” We engaged in discussion and activity around developing a teaching philosophy to coalesce our understanding of what we do (or aim to do) when we teach. Essentially, a teaching philosophy is a 1-2 page first-person “self-portrait” of you as a teacher that is carefully tailored to the specific job you are applying to. Dr. Jennifer Tatebe, Senior Lecturer at the University of Auckland and member of the FINE Leadership Team, encouraged us to consider a unique moment in our lives as teachers or learners that might exemplify how or why we teach the way we do, and how we might distinguish ourselves in writing that story. As a doctoral student who does not come from a teaching background, I recognized the process of developing the teaching philosophy as an important reflective exercise to think deeply about what I aim to do in teaching, what I am already doing that is working, and what areas of growth I might pursue while still on my doctoral journey and into an academic career.

Finally, a provocation for academic leaders in education: If we believe in the importance of teaching, how are you ensuring that it is a respected and nurtured aspect of academic work? How do you ensure doctoral students and early career researchers in particular have the opportunity and support to develop the necessary skills to become excellent teachers in the higher education setting? Rather than academics finding creative ways to make teaching count, how can this be structured into the way we do academia?

Thank you to the FINE leadership team for organizing an engaging and thought-provoking Forum, and for the U21 academic leaders who shared their experiences with us during the day and throughout the weekend.

Tanya Lubicz-Nawrocka 

University of Edinburgh

I had a fantastic experience, representing Moray House School of Education at the University of Edinburgh at the FINE meeting and events around the AERA conference in New York last month. It was an extremely valuable experience for networking, hearing interesting talks, and also gaining helpful tips to enhance the PhD experience. Several themes emerged throughout the FINE discussions, and below I share my reflections and the tips which were shared with me throughout the events. I hope you find them as helpful as I did.

Depth, breadth, and interdisciplinarity

It was highly recommended to have not just breadth but also depth in your work and, specifically, programmatic research that builds coherently and extends on previous work. Furthermore, reading outside of your subject area, engaging in interdisciplinary work, and taking risks by being open to different opportunities and interdisciplinary work was highly emphasised. For instance, Associate Professor Susan Bridges (Assistant Dean for Curriculum Innovation, University of Hong Kong) spoke about the value of making career choices based on what opportunities are most exciting or fun, and sometimes unexpected experiences or roles can have a massive, positive impact on your career and satisfaction of working in academia.

Although the AERA conference is focused on current educational research in the USA and attendees are therefore predominantly American, it was refreshing that the FINE meetings connected colleagues based at Universitas21 institutions around the world. The FINE sessions emphasised the fact that internationalisation is an opportunity and not an imposition, and underlined the importance of interdisciplinary work. Especially for those of us who are engaging in research on more controversial topics that unpick power dynamics (for example, my recent research article on challenging the status quo to embed partnership), it was reassuring that the established academics at the FINE meetings encouraged early career researchers to be true to their motivation for joining the academy. In this sense, networking and building relationships with colleagues was seen as a powerful way to break down barriers so that others may be more receptive to the more controversial aspects of our work.

Networking and collegiality: draw from the power of groups

The FINE Forum, joint symposia with the AERA Graduate Student Council, and the breakfast and reception events were great opportunities for networking with other PhD students from around the world as well as more experienced colleagues. I really enjoyed making new connections with researchers from the University of Auckland, University of British Columbia, University of Connecticut, and University of Nottingham, as well as reconnecting with a colleague from Hong Kong University.

While attending conferences, presenting your research and publishing, it was highly recommended that postgraduate and early career researchers take the opportunity to contribute to and learn from the academic community. This includes valuing feedback from peer reviewers and colleagues to help you improve your work. It also includes engaging in and drawing on the communities within our university departments.

Crafting your teaching identity

Gladis Kersaint (Dean of Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut) emphasised the importance of teaching in a scholar’s career. She noted that the focus tends to be on one’s research identity (which was a theme re-emerging throughout FINE events) but it is important to gain teaching experience (even if guest lecturing or teaching in other areas).

Later in the FINE meetings we learnt more from Alison Milner and Jennifer Tatebe (FINE Leadership Team Members) about how to articulate our teaching philosophy well to potential employers. They emphasised that the teaching philosophy statement is a self-reflective portrait of your teaching beliefs that demonstrates your key teaching experiences and shows understanding of your students. It is not only important for recruiters but also for your own professional development. It should include a few key teaching moments that illustrate your teaching philosophy, show synergies with your research, and – especially if being submitted with a job application – draw out synergies with the institution’s values and priorities.

Research for meaningful impact

Everyone focused on the importance of publishing to advance your career in academia and share your work. However, it is also important to have meaningful impact beyond academia by informing the public of your research and its implications. This includes sharing your work on Twitter, blogs such as this one, or newspapers. An example was that, for every journal article you publish, you should either write a blog post or opinion editorial piece to share your work more broadly.

Ways to ‘do it all’ – co-creation of research

Both Marc Beauchamp (Associate Dean of Research, University of British Columbia) and Andrew Noyes (Head of School of Education, University of Nottingham) shared insightful reflections about engaging in the co-creation of research with students. This is a topic near and dear to my heart since my PhD research focuses on student/staff partnerships in co-creating the higher education curriculum (for an overview if you are interested, see my three-minute thesis talk on my blog).

Marc spoke about ‘teaching like a rockstar’, by which he meant excellent student-centred teaching where faculty and tutors can work in partnership with undergraduate students to mentor them and involve them in their research. Andy emphasised ‘teaching like a troublemaker’, namely, not just focusing on efficient, ‘what works’ teaching methods, but developing students’ criticality. He suggested one way of doing this is to avoid dichotomising teaching and research and by engaging in research through teaching by involving students.

We discussed how there has been so little resolution in the teaching/research dichotomy in the last few generations so perhaps co-creation is a solution by involving students more in teaching decision-making and in research. In this regard, Rowena Arshad (Head of Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh) spoke powerfully about the importance of knowing and trusting our students, and the opportunities that co-creation can present when working in partnership with students.

Concluding remarks

The FINE meetings and events surrounding the AERA conference provided valuable panel discussions, networking opportunities, and food for thought. It was great to be part of the FINE collaborations with the AERA Graduate Student Council and to have the opportunity to attend such a wide range of conference sessions at AERA. I really enjoyed hearing tips from senior academics. It is therefore appropriate to end on their wise suggestions to firstly, own both the privilege and the responsibilities that come from being part of academia and, secondly, to enjoy the journey as an early career researcher by exploring and maintaining the feeling of excitement which resonates with our original motivations for doing a PhD.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR / PROFESSOR IN PROGRAM EVALUATION

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR / PROFESSOR IN PROGRAM EVALUATION at the University of Melbourne, Australia

Closes: 24 May, 2018

Job no: 0045050
Work type: Continuing
Location: Parkville

– Join Australia’s number 1 University †

– Career opportunities, professional development, work-life balance.

– Use your expertise and innovative thinking to have an impact.

Who says you can’t change the world? We expect to do nothing less.

Melbourne Graduate School of Education

Salary: $145,685 – $160,500 p.a. (Level D) or $187,654 p.a. (Level E), plus 17% superannuation. Level of appointment is subject to qualifications and experience.

The University of Melbourne has an outstanding reputation for excellence in teaching and research.  This commitment to excellence has seen the University bring together the brightest minds to redefine best practice in online education to deliver unparalleled quality education, 100% online, to students worldwide.

The Centre for Program Evaluation (CPE) occupies a unique position within the Melbourne Graduate School of Education and is the only multidisciplinary dedicated evaluation research Centre within the southern hemisphere. It offers postgraduate and higher degree programs in evaluation nationally and internationally. Students are taught in an online mode and as well as through its executive programs.

The CPE is now seeking an Associate Professor/Professor level academic to lead the activities of the centre and research programs central to the foci of the Centre.  This appointment includes a 0.5 FTE Directorship role of the Centre for Program Evaluation for 5 years.  The appointee will provide strong academic leadership within the Melbourne Graduate School of Education and will contribute with exceptional scholarly expertise, strategic planning and academic management to the refinement and enhancement of student opportunities to build and deliver world class academic programs in the Centre for Program Evaluation. The Associate Professor/Professor level academic will be expected to provide vision and academic leadership to advance research in evaluation including liaising with funding bodies, managing research contracts and publishing research of international significance.  The appointee will also be involved in graduate teaching, supervision, ensuring high quality outcomes.

The successful applicant will have already demonstrated the following achievements or capabilities:

  1. A doctoral degree in a cognate/relevant discipline area
  2. A distinguished career in research, policy and practice
  3. An internationally recognised program of research and body of academic work, including significant publications
  4. Evidence of a substantial track record of gaining substantial competitive research grants and consultancies
  5. A record of success in teaching at university level, including the design of courses
  6. Strong leadership skills and a demonstrated ability to build and maintain successful research teams, research partnerships and collaborations in evaluation
  7. A demonstrated record of successful supervision of higher degree students
  8. A demonstrated ability to manage budgets
  9. Demonstrated capacity to work collaboratively with colleagues both within and outside the university
  10. Excellent leadership ability to provide strategic focus and direction, fostering a culture of innovation and collaborative academic achievement
  11. Exceptional interpersonal and communication skills, with proven success in working collaboratively with diverse stakeholders including academic peers, industry, community, policy makers and government.

Associate Professor or Professor in Program Evaluation will be required to undertake the responsibilities of a Professor of the University and the Faculty as outlined in: Leadership Roles of Melbourne Professors (see below). All Professors are members of the Academic Board of the University.

Close date: 24 May 2018

Position Description and Selection Criteria

Download File 0045050.pdf

Leadership Roles of Melbourne Professors

Download File Leadership Roles of Melbourne Professors April 2017.pdf

For information to assist you with compiling short statements to answer the selection criteria, please go to https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

 

 

Advertised: AUS Eastern Standard Time
Applications close: AUS Eastern Standard Time

Assistant Professor (Educational Administration)

Assistant Professor (Educational Administration) at Lakehead University, Canada

Closes: Review of applications will begin April 27, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Lakehead University, invites applications for a three (3)-year Limited Term Appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education (Orillia Campus), in the area of Educational Administration. The academic rank of the appointment will be commensurate with the qualifications of the successful candidate. The position will commence on August 1, 2018.

Preference will be given to candidates with expertise in social aspects of education including democracy, global education, citizenship, diversity and equity. Applicants must have an earned PhD and an active research program. Experience in teaching in elementary schools would be an asset. The successful candidate will demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with others on the continued development of the academic and research cultures of the Faculty, and be able to contribute to the teaching and development of courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The Faculty of Education has 26 full-time faculty members and offers Pre-Service Teacher Education, BA/BED (Indigenous Learning Major) Intermediate/Senior, Indigenous Language Teacher’s Diploma, Continuing Education, MEd, and PhD programs.

Lakehead is a comprehensive university with a reputation for innovative programs and cutting-edge research. With campuses located in Thunder Bay and Orillia, Lakehead has approximately 10,000 students and 2,160 faculty and staff. With an emphasis on collaborative learning and independent critical thinking and a multidisciplinary teaching approach, Lakehead offers a variety of degree and diploma programs at the undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral levels through its ten faculties, including Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Health and Behavioral Sciences, Natural Resources Management, Science and Environmental Studies, Social Sciences and Humanities, Graduate Studies, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (West Campus) and Ontario’s newest Faculty of Law. For further information, please visit: www.lakeheadu.ca.

For further information, please contact Dr. Frances Helyar, Chair of Orillia Education Programs. Detailed information on the Faculty and our programs is available at: https://www.lakeheadu.ca/academics/departments/education

Review of applications will begin April 27, 2018 and continue until the position is filled. The electronic application (in the form of one PDF document) should include: a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, evidence of teaching effectiveness (including a statement of teaching philosophy, course outlines and teaching evaluations for previously-taught courses), a statement of a research plan (current and future interests), copies of the three most significant publications, and the names and contact information of three references. Applicants should submit their electronic application to:

Dr. John O’Meara, Dean
kanderso@lakeheadu.ca
Faculty of Education
Lakehead University
Thunder Bay, Ontario
Email: karen.anderson@lakeheadu.ca
Fax: (807) 346-7918

A completed Confirmation of Eligibility to Work in Canada form must accompany your package. This form is available on our website at https://www.lakeheadu.ca/faculty-and-staff/departments/services/hr/employment-opportunites.

Lakehead University is committed to creating a diverse and inclusive environment and welcomes applications from all qualified individuals including women, racialized persons, Indigenous people, persons with disabilities and other equity-seeking groups. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. This is in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements.

We appreciate your interest; however, only those selected for an interview will be notified. Lakehead University is committed to supporting an accessible environment. Please ask us how we may help you by contacting the Office of Human Resources, Lakehead University, (807) 343.8334, human.resources@lakeheadu.ca.

Full time Faculty position in Education and Technology

Full time Faculty position in Education and Technology at Royal Roads University, BC, Canada

Closes: 2018-05-11

Royal Roads University (RRU) invites your interest in a faculty appointment at the rank of assistant, associate or full professor within our School of Education and Technology in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences. As a full-time core faculty member, you will play a key role in the delivery of the school’s Educational Leadership and Management program. You will also have experience with academic administration and course development.

The MA in Educational Leadership and Management (MAELM) program is designed to help educators develop a critically reflective understanding of school improvement concepts and research. Please see the program page for more details.

Our ideal candidate is passionate about helping others achieve their academic pursuits and will have demonstrated teaching experience at the graduate level in the field of K-12 education, an ability to work as a team member within an interdisciplinary outcome-based curriculum, and administrative experience and abilities, preferably in a university academic setting.

In recognition of the anticipated rank of the role, preference will be given to early and mid-career scholars whose research and teaching contribute to the fields of education.

RRU is committed to appreciating and celebrating the diversity of students, faculty, and staff. We strive to increase understanding and acceptance of each other, thereby making us more compassionate human beings and strengthening the fabric of our communities.

Requirements

  • Doctorate or ABD in education or related field
  • K-12 teaching and administrative experience
  • Demonstrated teaching excellence at the graduate level (employing adult learning and applied learning principles) in the field of K-12 education
  • Experience with applied research methods
  • Graduate student supervision experience and an understanding of the ethical requirements of graduate research
  • Familiarity with online and face-to-face course design and delivery
  • Experience in the integration and application of adult learning principles in course design and delivery
  • Ability to develop networks in the K-12 sector, both locally and globally
  • Knowledge of International Baccalaureate schools
  • Proven track record in research with an emphasis on practical application
  • Demonstrated ability to work collegially as a team member with a variety of teams and stakeholder groups across the university (faculty, sessional faculty, practitioners, university staff and management)
  • Demonstrated experience in an outcomes-based and interdisciplinary learning environment (preferred)

Additional Information

In addition to a collegial learning community, RRU offers a comprehensive compensation package, with a starting salary and academic rank based on qualifications and experience. This is an initial five-year appointment with the possibility of conversion into a continuing appointment, subject to performance and program needs.

Applications

https://royalroads.mua.hrdepartment.com/hr/ats/Posting/view/73